Affect Me. Social Media Images in Art

  • Artists:
    Lara BaladiIrene ChabrForensic ArchitectureD. H. SaurLynn Hershman LeesonThomas HirschhornRanda MaroufiRabih MrouéThomas Ruff
  • Date:
    11.11.2017 to 10.3.2018
  • Venue:

In the age of Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Co. the use of images has changed fundamentally. Images circulating in digital networks have become the most important personal means of expression for a broad public. The interactive component of Web 2.0 creates a new dialogue-based space in which users* can communicate almost in real time. Especially when images are used as a vehicle for communication, the frequency of this dialogue accelerates rapidly. After all, pictures with their high affectionate potential play virtuously on the keyboard of emotions and trigger spontaneous reactions from their addressees. Ad hoc and sometimes out of the gut is commented on what others post. This includes banalities from the lives of users as well as pictorial evidence from the global hotspots of our present day. The meaning of these images is created by acting with them, by means of interaction processes between images and people, which are characterized above all by affective dynamics. The images move the users, become mass-produced’ geliked’ or provoke protests, cause criticism and uninhibited vulgar behaviour, promote public debates and have a community-building effect. They are often taken up, posted or published in new contexts, modified with image processing programs or imitated with new images.

 

Particularly with regard to contemporary forms of political protest, the democratic promise of images disseminated via the social media to provide alternative perspectives on the political crises of the present is manifested. The increase in ideological propaganda and counterfeit information in the social media may have brought them into disrepute as channels of knowledge transfer. However, in the global protest movements of the last few years, it is precisely the private photo taken with a mobile phone camera and disseminated online in the networks that has become perhaps the most important instrument for forming an independent opinion.

 

This is where the exhibition Affect Me. Social media images in style. It presents works from nine international artistic positions that refer to the new pictorial phenomena of the social media and explicitly take up pictorial material that was fed into the net in the context of global political debates and civil society protests. In their works, they reflect the modes of use and semantics of these images, but also deal with their aesthetic qualities. Sometimes they allow us to immerse ourselves deeply in the places and events of our current world in upheaval. On another occasion, the artists take a more distanced perspective. They illuminate the ability of the pictures to mobilize and show how these pictures create facts and thereby act on the porous border between reality and fiction.

Forensic Architecture, Air Strike Atimah, 2015

Lara Baladi Be Realistic, Ask for the Impossible, 2017 Multimediainstallation, bestehend aus LED- Laufschrift, drei Videoinstallationen und Wandgemälden in Collaboration mit Salma Elbalouty | Courtesy die Künstlerin | Foto: Alexandra Höner

Lynn Hershman Leeson, Big Hoodie, 2016

Thomas Ruff, Jpeg Ny11, 2006

Installationsansicht Irene Chabr, Thomas Hirschhorn, Thomas Ruff & Lynn Hershman Leeson, Arthena Foundation 2017 Foto: Alexandra Höner, Courtesy die Künstler, Konrad Fischer Galerie (Thomas Ruff), Waldburger Wouters © VG Bildkunst, Bonn 2017

Affect Me. Social Media Images in Art

  • Artists:
    Lara BaladiIrene ChabrForensic ArchitectureD. H. SaurLynn Hershman LeesonThomas HirschhornRanda MaroufiRabih MrouéThomas Ruff
  • Date:
    11.11.2017 to 10.3.2018
  • Venue:

In the age of Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Co. the use of images has changed fundamentally. Images circulating in digital networks have become the most important personal means of expression for a broad public. The interactive component of Web 2.0 creates a new dialogue-based space in which users* can communicate almost in real time. Especially when images are used as a vehicle for communication, the frequency of this dialogue accelerates rapidly. After all, pictures with their high affectionate potential play virtuously on the keyboard of emotions and trigger spontaneous reactions from their addressees. Ad hoc and sometimes out of the gut is commented on what others post. This includes banalities from the lives of users as well as pictorial evidence from the global hotspots of our present day. The meaning of these images is created by acting with them, by means of interaction processes between images and people, which are characterized above all by affective dynamics. The images move the users, become mass-produced’ geliked’ or provoke protests, cause criticism and uninhibited vulgar behaviour, promote public debates and have a community-building effect. They are often taken up, posted or published in new contexts, modified with image processing programs or imitated with new images.

 

Particularly with regard to contemporary forms of political protest, the democratic promise of images disseminated via the social media to provide alternative perspectives on the political crises of the present is manifested. The increase in ideological propaganda and counterfeit information in the social media may have brought them into disrepute as channels of knowledge transfer. However, in the global protest movements of the last few years, it is precisely the private photo taken with a mobile phone camera and disseminated online in the networks that has become perhaps the most important instrument for forming an independent opinion.

 

This is where the exhibition Affect Me. Social media images in style. It presents works from nine international artistic positions that refer to the new pictorial phenomena of the social media and explicitly take up pictorial material that was fed into the net in the context of global political debates and civil society protests. In their works, they reflect the modes of use and semantics of these images, but also deal with their aesthetic qualities. Sometimes they allow us to immerse ourselves deeply in the places and events of our current world in upheaval. On another occasion, the artists take a more distanced perspective. They illuminate the ability of the pictures to mobilize and show how these pictures create facts and thereby act on the porous border between reality and fiction.