Das Erbe der Zeitzeugen: Licht-Collagen/Fotografien von Bernard Langerock

The series of twelve commemorative portraits is the result of an intensive examination of the biographies of some contemporary witnesses of the National Socialist era. For many years they reported impressively and memorably about their fate as persecuted persons in the so-called Third Reich within the framework of the memorial work, and they campaigned against oblivion and repression.

 

Artistically it is not about presenting classical portraits, but rather the attempt is made to visualize inner images as a living process. Memories of people, situations or objects are often fragmented, overlaid or encrusted; they come from different periods of life. Some memories are more intense than others, some are clear, others blurry. The memory process is also linked to the human body and its abilities. The light collages/photographs simulate the process of visual storage, processing and retrieval of images in the human brain.

 

Based on analogue archive material (photos, slides, films) working templates were projected onto a light-storage carrier material in a darkroom with several projectors. Various techniques such as after-exposure, moving or waving were used. The resulting light collages of stored and reflected light were photographed in the short period of their existence, reworked and then printed on cellulose sheets.

 

Guided tour of the exhibition: Saturday, 17 February, and Sunday, 18 February, 15 Uh

 

Maria Wachter 1910 – 2010: Bernard Langerock, Licht-Collage/Fotografie, 2017

Hermann Laupsien 1910 – 2007: Bernard Langerock, Licht-Collage/Fotografie, 2017

Das Erbe der Zeitzeugen: Licht-Collagen/Fotografien von Bernard Langerock

The series of twelve commemorative portraits is the result of an intensive examination of the biographies of some contemporary witnesses of the National Socialist era. For many years they reported impressively and memorably about their fate as persecuted persons in the so-called Third Reich within the framework of the memorial work, and they campaigned against oblivion and repression.

 

Artistically it is not about presenting classical portraits, but rather the attempt is made to visualize inner images as a living process. Memories of people, situations or objects are often fragmented, overlaid or encrusted; they come from different periods of life. Some memories are more intense than others, some are clear, others blurry. The memory process is also linked to the human body and its abilities. The light collages/photographs simulate the process of visual storage, processing and retrieval of images in the human brain.

 

Based on analogue archive material (photos, slides, films) working templates were projected onto a light-storage carrier material in a darkroom with several projectors. Various techniques such as after-exposure, moving or waving were used. The resulting light collages of stored and reflected light were photographed in the short period of their existence, reworked and then printed on cellulose sheets.

 

Guided tour of the exhibition: Saturday, 17 February, and Sunday, 18 February, 15 Uh