Dennis Hopper. Photographs 1961-1967

“Art is a constant; it is part of you. I think the idea of experiencing life is part of your creative path.”

 

And for the American actor and film director Dennis Hopper, photography was one of them. With his portraits of artists, actors, art dealers, hippies, his images of the freedom march against racial discrimination in Alabama, or his everyday car snapshots, Dennis Hopper acquired a reputation early on. Among friends, he was for a long time regarded as “the tourist” because his Nikon was constantly dangling in front of his belly, until he hung up his camera in 1967 and took up the work for his world success “Easy Rider”. In just a few years, a total of around 18,000 snapshots were taken, which are now regarded as icons of the 1960s and represent the image of an American society in transition. “I wanted to hold something. I wanted to leave something behind that would be a record, whether it was about Martin Luther King, the hippies or artists,”he later said. In short: groundbreaking pictures.

 

James Dean, close friend and colleague in movies like “… because they don’t know what they are doing” and “giants”, had inspired him to do photography. With his Nikon, a birthday present from his wife at the time, he first travelled through New York, later Hollywood or Alabama and photographed both glamorous and everyday life. Without a flash, without cutting or editing the images, his shots tell stories that unfurl in front of our eyes, almost as small films.

 

Dennis Hopper was close friends with Hans Mayer for many years, and so the gallery Hans Mayer presented four exhibitions in Düsseldorf and Berlin in 1988. Dennis Hopper confirmed his simple credo in several interviews. Whether as an actor, director, scriptwriter or photographer:”I am a compulsive creator.”

Dennis Hopper, Andy Warhol (with flower smiling), 1963/2000

Dennis Hopper, American Flag

Dennis Hopper, Daily News Harlem

Dennis Hopper, Martin Luther King

Dennis Hopper. Photographs 1961-1967

“Art is a constant; it is part of you. I think the idea of experiencing life is part of your creative path.”

 

And for the American actor and film director Dennis Hopper, photography was one of them. With his portraits of artists, actors, art dealers, hippies, his images of the freedom march against racial discrimination in Alabama, or his everyday car snapshots, Dennis Hopper acquired a reputation early on. Among friends, he was for a long time regarded as “the tourist” because his Nikon was constantly dangling in front of his belly, until he hung up his camera in 1967 and took up the work for his world success “Easy Rider”. In just a few years, a total of around 18,000 snapshots were taken, which are now regarded as icons of the 1960s and represent the image of an American society in transition. “I wanted to hold something. I wanted to leave something behind that would be a record, whether it was about Martin Luther King, the hippies or artists,”he later said. In short: groundbreaking pictures.

 

James Dean, close friend and colleague in movies like “… because they don’t know what they are doing” and “giants”, had inspired him to do photography. With his Nikon, a birthday present from his wife at the time, he first travelled through New York, later Hollywood or Alabama and photographed both glamorous and everyday life. Without a flash, without cutting or editing the images, his shots tell stories that unfurl in front of our eyes, almost as small films.

 

Dennis Hopper was close friends with Hans Mayer for many years, and so the gallery Hans Mayer presented four exhibitions in Düsseldorf and Berlin in 1988. Dennis Hopper confirmed his simple credo in several interviews. Whether as an actor, director, scriptwriter or photographer:”I am a compulsive creator.”