Imago. Anna Grzelewska und Zuza Krajewska

Insects in the Imago stage look like adult specimens, but are smaller. Imago are no longer larvae or dolls, they are no longer transformed. At the same time, however, they are also not full-grown specimens, in the full sense of this meaning.

 

This zoological metaphor fits well with the long-standing series “Julia Wannabe”. The title heroine is the daughter of Anna Grzelewska. The girl, photographed over several years, undergoes a metamorphosis before our eyes. The golden-haired angel who falls asleep in her parents’ bed becomes a beautiful young girl who is aware of her femininity. This path of development is paved with tears, shame before the eyes of others, resignation, experiments with one’s own appearance and dreams. The title heroine transforms from a non-self-employed to an independent person who is aware of her own values and will soon leave her parents’ home. Anna Grzelewska’s photography focused on the moment of change in every person’s life, full of experiments, mistakes and indecisions.

 

The boys portrayed by Zuza Krajewska are about the same age as Julia. However, they do not live in houses with their parents and siblings like Julia, but in a reform school. How did they get there? By experimenting with growing up and not complying with social norms. The reform school is supposed to reintegrate them into society, teach them how to function among people.

 

The portraits by Zuza Krajewska are full of duality. The people looking at us from the pictures on the one hand seem childish, awkward and innocent, but on the other hand also frighteningly grown-up and marked by life. On the faces removed from facial hair appears a mischievous smile of a typical troublemaker, another time a grimace with torn lips showing an absolute tenacity. The eyes of one boy shine on a photo full of enthusiasm and joie de vivre, on another one a young person looks at us with the gaze of a person who “has already seen everything”.

Anna Grzelewska, Serie Julia Wannabe, 2015

Zuza Krajewska, Adrian and Andrzej-twins, 2016

Anna Grzelewska, Serie Julia Wannabe, 2015

Zuza Krajewska, Zemo and Bajka, 2016

Zuza Krajewska, Mateusz And His Birds, 2016

Imago. Anna Grzelewska und Zuza Krajewska

Insects in the Imago stage look like adult specimens, but are smaller. Imago are no longer larvae or dolls, they are no longer transformed. At the same time, however, they are also not full-grown specimens, in the full sense of this meaning.

 

This zoological metaphor fits well with the long-standing series “Julia Wannabe”. The title heroine is the daughter of Anna Grzelewska. The girl, photographed over several years, undergoes a metamorphosis before our eyes. The golden-haired angel who falls asleep in her parents’ bed becomes a beautiful young girl who is aware of her femininity. This path of development is paved with tears, shame before the eyes of others, resignation, experiments with one’s own appearance and dreams. The title heroine transforms from a non-self-employed to an independent person who is aware of her own values and will soon leave her parents’ home. Anna Grzelewska’s photography focused on the moment of change in every person’s life, full of experiments, mistakes and indecisions.

 

The boys portrayed by Zuza Krajewska are about the same age as Julia. However, they do not live in houses with their parents and siblings like Julia, but in a reform school. How did they get there? By experimenting with growing up and not complying with social norms. The reform school is supposed to reintegrate them into society, teach them how to function among people.

 

The portraits by Zuza Krajewska are full of duality. The people looking at us from the pictures on the one hand seem childish, awkward and innocent, but on the other hand also frighteningly grown-up and marked by life. On the faces removed from facial hair appears a mischievous smile of a typical troublemaker, another time a grimace with torn lips showing an absolute tenacity. The eyes of one boy shine on a photo full of enthusiasm and joie de vivre, on another one a young person looks at us with the gaze of a person who “has already seen everything”.