Jan Dibbets. Stop Photography Now!

For Jan Dibbets, the importance of photography lies more in its special characteristics and technical possibilities than in its content and themes. Thus the artistic oeuvre of Jan Dibbets should also be seen and understood in the context of conceptual art as well as its forerunners – Muybridge, Blossfeldt, Man Ray Rodchenko, Man Ray or Duchamp – and his contemporaries – Bruce Nauman, Sol LeWitt, Gilbert & George and Richard Long. Perception itself, and not the perceived object or the representation of a “real world”, is at the centre of his work. His motifs include the high-gloss lacquer surfaces of cars, light and shadow plays on blinds, windows, photo sequences of interiors and – as a bridge between his early and current works – digital reworking of his own early photographic material. Jan Dibbet’s photo dialogues between Dutch landscapes, sea horizons and shifts in perspective, as well as the series of “Perspective Corrections” are among his most famous works and make Dibbets one of the fathers of conceptual photography. So, to talk to Dibbets: Stop taking pictures and start thinking about photography!

 

Already in 1972 Jan Dibbets represented the Netherlands at the Venice Biennale. Earlier in his career he took part in such legendary exhibitions as Serial Formations (Frankfurt am Main, 1967), Arte Povera (Amalfi, 1967), Konzept/Conception (Leverkusen, 1968), When Attitudes Become Form (Bern, Krefeld, London, 1968), Op Losse Schroeven (Amsterdam, Essen, 1968), Information (New York, 1970) and documenta 5,6 and 7 (1) Later his works were shown in important exhibitions, including Westkunst (Cologne, 1981), Bilderstreit (Cologne, 1989) and Light Years. Conceptual Art and the Photographer (Chicago, 2011). His most important solo projects include exhibitions at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam (1972,1986,2016), Kunsthalle Bern (1980), Guggenheim Museum New York (1987), Walker Art Center (1988), Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (1996), Stichting De Pont (2001), Musée d’ Art Moderne Paris (2010) and Castello di Rivoli, Turin (2014). In 2016 Jan Dibbets curated the exhibition Pandra’s Box at the Musée d’ Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Another Photography “- an overview of his ideas for a different interpretation of historical and contemporary photography.

 

Jan Dibbets has been represented by the Konrad Fischer Gallery since 1968. His works are represented in important institutional collections, including the MoMA in New York, the Metropolitan Museum, New York, Walker Art Center, the TATE Modern, London, the MIGROS Museum in Zurich, the Fotomuseum Winterthur, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, the Kröller-Müller Museum in Otterlo, the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg and the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf.

Jan Dibbets, New Colorstudy, 1976-2012

Jan Dibbets, New Colorstudy, 1976-2012

Jan Dibbets, Duo Z, 1976-2014

Jan Dibbets, SVB2c Amsterdam 125. 1994

Jan Dibbets, Venetian Blind, 2014

Jan Dibbets, Perspective Collection Sol LeWitt

Jan Dibbets. Stop Photography Now!

For Jan Dibbets, the importance of photography lies more in its special characteristics and technical possibilities than in its content and themes. Thus the artistic oeuvre of Jan Dibbets should also be seen and understood in the context of conceptual art as well as its forerunners – Muybridge, Blossfeldt, Man Ray Rodchenko, Man Ray or Duchamp – and his contemporaries – Bruce Nauman, Sol LeWitt, Gilbert & George and Richard Long. Perception itself, and not the perceived object or the representation of a “real world”, is at the centre of his work. His motifs include the high-gloss lacquer surfaces of cars, light and shadow plays on blinds, windows, photo sequences of interiors and – as a bridge between his early and current works – digital reworking of his own early photographic material. Jan Dibbet’s photo dialogues between Dutch landscapes, sea horizons and shifts in perspective, as well as the series of “Perspective Corrections” are among his most famous works and make Dibbets one of the fathers of conceptual photography. So, to talk to Dibbets: Stop taking pictures and start thinking about photography!

 

Already in 1972 Jan Dibbets represented the Netherlands at the Venice Biennale. Earlier in his career he took part in such legendary exhibitions as Serial Formations (Frankfurt am Main, 1967), Arte Povera (Amalfi, 1967), Konzept/Conception (Leverkusen, 1968), When Attitudes Become Form (Bern, Krefeld, London, 1968), Op Losse Schroeven (Amsterdam, Essen, 1968), Information (New York, 1970) and documenta 5,6 and 7 (1) Later his works were shown in important exhibitions, including Westkunst (Cologne, 1981), Bilderstreit (Cologne, 1989) and Light Years. Conceptual Art and the Photographer (Chicago, 2011). His most important solo projects include exhibitions at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam (1972,1986,2016), Kunsthalle Bern (1980), Guggenheim Museum New York (1987), Walker Art Center (1988), Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (1996), Stichting De Pont (2001), Musée d’ Art Moderne Paris (2010) and Castello di Rivoli, Turin (2014). In 2016 Jan Dibbets curated the exhibition Pandra’s Box at the Musée d’ Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Another Photography “- an overview of his ideas for a different interpretation of historical and contemporary photography.

 

Jan Dibbets has been represented by the Konrad Fischer Gallery since 1968. His works are represented in important institutional collections, including the MoMA in New York, the Metropolitan Museum, New York, Walker Art Center, the TATE Modern, London, the MIGROS Museum in Zurich, the Fotomuseum Winterthur, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, the Kröller-Müller Museum in Otterlo, the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg and the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf.